Lung Cancer Screening

Lung cancer screening with low dose CT removes the belief many share - that if they have smoked for many years, there is no use in trying to quit now. These screenings can help individuals retake control of their destiny. Quitting smoking not only reduces one's chances of lung cancer but just as importantly stroke, heart attack, and peripheral vascular disease.

Flagler Hospital has been designated a Lung Cancer Screening Center by the American College of Radiology (ACR). ACR Lung Cancer Screening Center designation recognizes facilities that have committed to practice safe, effective diagnostic care for individuals at the highest risk for lung cancer.
In order to receive this elite distinction, facilities must be accredited by the ACR in computed tomography in the chest module, as well as undergo a rigorous assessment of its lung cancer screening protocol and infrastructure. Also required are procedures in place for follow-up patient care, such as counseling and smoking cessation programs.

WHO IS ELIGIBLE FOR SCREENING?
Lung cancer screening is not appropriate for everybody. You qualify for screening if you:
• are between 55-77 years old
• have smoked within the last 15 years, and
• have smoked 30-pack-years or more (A pack year is used to describe how many cigarettes you have smoked in your lifetime, with a pack equal to 20 cigarettes. For example, if you have smoked 2 packs a day for 15 years, you have 30 pack years)

What are the benefits of screening?
For people who are eligible for screening and decide to get screened, the chances of finding cancer earlier is higher. Finding cancer early generally means that there are more treatment options available. A recent study in 2004 conducted by, The National Lung Screening Trial Research Team, showed that after 6.5 years, those who were screened with CT were 20% less likely to die from lung cancer compared to those who were not screened. Do you meet the criteria above? Ask your doctor if you could benefit from lung cancer screening.